Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool – a tour of one of the UK’s most amazing cities

We bet that you will fall in love with the city of Liverpool! The diversity of its neighbourhoods, the magnificence of its historic heritage, the richness of its architecture and the peacefulness of its parks will be the ideal scenery for your 2017 Marathon.

Marathons are a terrific way to get to know a city in-depth and discover its best-kept secrets. And a place like Liverpool has it all covered. Follow us in this guided tour through the very best of your Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool.

Read the mile by mile run down of what to expect on your Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool Marathon 2017.

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Mile 0: Albert Dock: Marathon and half start off with an electric atmosphere at Albert Dock, the most visited multi-use attraction in the UK, outside London and a World Heritage Site.

Albert Dock. Photo: Jennifer Boyer
Albert Dock. Photo by Jennifer Boyer, http://bit.ly/24CwtwG

Mile 0.4: the Royal Liver Building. Shortly after the start the course goes past fabulous historical attractions on Water Street. The Royal Liver Building is sited at the Pier Head Building and, along with the neighbouring Cunard Building and Port of Liverpool Building, is one of Liverpool’s Three Graces, which line the city’s waterfront. The Royal Liver Building is one of the most recognisable landmarks in the city of Liverpool and is home to two fabled Liver Birds (pronounced ‘Lie-Ver’) that watch over the city and the sea. Legend has it that were these two birds to fly away, then the city would cease to exist.

The Royal Liver Building.
The Royal Liver Building. Photo by Miguel Mendez, http://bit.ly/1YdMbus

Mile 0.5: The Beatles statue. Unveiled last December, it is one of the novelties of the 2016 Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool race route. Weighing 1.2 tonnes, the sculpture was donated to the city by the Cavern Club on the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ last concert in their home city.

The new Beatles statues. Photo: Flickr user wisebuys21, http://bit.ly/23w2kwt
The new Beatles statues. Photo by Flickr user wisebuys21, http://bit.ly/23w2kwt

Mile 4.5 (marathon only): Everton FC Stadium / Goodison Park. Liverpool is just mad about football! And the marathon course runs by both clubs’ stadiums starting with the Everton one, referred to by local fans as “the Grand Old Lady” (it’s been there since 1892!).

Goodison Park. Photo by Airviews Photography, http://bit.ly/1SWTlQ5
Goodison Park. Photo by Airviews Photography, http://bit.ly/1SWTlQ5

Mile 6 (marathon only): Stanley Park. This lovely 110 acres area is widely known for dividing the home grounds of rival Merseyside football clubs Everton and Liverpool! But there’s more than that – for example its grand terraces and the majestic Isla Gladstone Conservatory, built in 1899.

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Mile 7 (marathon only): Liverpool FC Stadium / Anfield. Liverpool FC fans will get an extra boost of excitement as they get a chance to catch a glimpse of the football stadium. Did you know that Anfield was originally the home of Everton F.C. from 1884 to 1891, before they moved to Goodison Park after a dispute?

Anfield. Photo by Airviews Photography, http://bit.ly/1rDyslY
Anfield. Photo by Airviews Photography, http://bit.ly/1rDyslY

Mile 7.8 (marathon only): Everton Library. A unique, triangular-shaped building with a tiled roof. Look for the octagonal corner turret at the corner of St Domingo Road/Beacon Lane.

The Everton Library. Photo by Flickr user Secret Pilgrim, http://bit.ly/1SV0XWS
The Everton Library. Photo by Flickr user Secret Pilgrim, http://bit.ly/1SV0XWS

Mile 8.5 (marathon only): Everton Park Valley. Enjoy spectacular views of the city skyline and over the other side of the Mersey River! This is the highest land point in Liverpool.

A night view of the Mersey and - across it - Birkenhead. Photo by Christopher Czernak, http://bit.ly/1SWWTlt
A night view of the Mersey and – across it – Birkenhead. Photo by Christopher Czernak, http://bit.ly/1SWWTlt

Mile 9.5 (marathon only): The Cultural Quarter. A sequence of stunning public buildings, including the Walker Art Gallery, the Central Library and the World Museum.

The Walker Art Gallery. Photo by Fabio Paoleri, http://bit.ly/1QV6Ld9
The Walker Art Gallery. Photo by Fabio Paoleri, http://bit.ly/1QV6Ld9

Mile 1.8 (Half Marathon) | 10.2 (Full Marathon): The Cavern Club. The legendary centre of the rock and roll scene in Liverpool in the 1960s. The Beatles had their first performance there on Thursday 9 February 1961 – followed by 291 other gigs between 1961 and 1963. As you run by, make sure you don’t miss the sculpture of John Lennon and the Liverpool Wall of Fame, with the names of all the groups which played at the original Cavern Club.

The inside of the Cavern Club. Photo by Ronald Saunders, http://bit.ly/1T4srrQ
The inside of the Cavern Club. Photo by Ronald Saunders, http://bit.ly/1T4srrQ

Mile 2.0 (Half Marathon) | 10.3 (Full Marathon): Derby Square. Home to the Queen Victoria Monument, Derby Square is the former site of the Liverpool Castle, which was demolished in the 1700s.

The Victoria Monument at Derby Square. Photo by Robert Cutts, http://bit.ly/1s3uNi6
The Victoria Monument at Derby Square. Photo by Robert Cutts, http://bit.ly/1s3uNi6

Mile 3.5 (HM) | 11.5 (FM): The Anglican Cathedral. Officially the “Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool”, it is the longest (189m) and fifth biggest cathedral in the world. It is also home to the UK’s biggest organ (made up of 10,267 pipes) and sports the world’s heaviest bells (31.5 tonnes, with the largest one – named “Great George” – being bigger than Big Ben). Not directly on the route but still within seeing distance is also the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral (known locally as “the catholic cathedral”). Build in the 1960s, it’s surmounted by an iconic tower in the shape of a truncated cone.

The Anglican Cathedral. Photo by Flickr user Loco Steve, http://bit.ly/24BxE2Z
The Anglican Cathedral. Photo by Flickr user Loco Steve, http://bit.ly/24BxE2Z

Mile 4.8 (HM) | 13.0 (FM): Princes Park/ Princes Avenue. The surrounding area is known to have the oldest black community in the UK.

Mile 5.5 (HM) | 15 (FM): Sefton Park. Arguably the best known and most loved park by locals. This lush green space, home to countless runs by Liverpudlians every day, also encompasses a lake and an impressive Victorian palm house.

The Sefton Park palm house. Photo by Paul White, http://bit.ly/24DUwLL
The Sefton Park palm house. Photo by Paul White, http://bit.ly/24DUwLL

Mile 6.8 (HM) | 17.8 (FM): Penny Lane. Legend has it that Paul McCartney and John Lennon would meet at Penny Lane junction to catch a bus into the centre of the city. The song Penny Lane was released in February 1967.

The iconic Penny Lane street sign. Photo by Flickr user Radarsmum67, http://bit.ly/1q6g9oq
The iconic Penny Lane street sign. Photo by Flickr user Radarsmum67, http://bit.ly/1q6g9oq

Mile 12.5 (HM) | 25.5 (FM): Brunswick, Coburg, Queens and Wapping docks. – Final dive into the Port of Liverpool, running past a series of docks and maritime buildings reminiscing of the heydays of the city as one of the world’s busiest commercial and passengers’ ports.

Docks at night. Photo by Flickr user Radarsmum67, http://bit.ly/1TwICeO
Docks at night. Photo by Flickr user Radarsmum67, http://bit.ly/1TwICeO
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